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| January 22, 2023
Years in Review

Reverse Shot's annual awards and accolades including Best Pandemic Party, Most Unshakable and Cynical Endings, Best Actress, Scariest Comedy, Greatest Ignored Performance, Least Necessary Retread, and the Offenses.

feature
| January 11, 2023
Years in Review

It may have felt like a wasteland, but, judging by the voters in our annual poll, we nevertheless experienced a wealth of films that excited us and gave us hope.

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By Leonardo Goi | January 26, 2023

There is this weird sense of grief for someone who is still alive, technically, but you also understand that you can live through opposite things at the same moment. Grief and sadness. Rebirth and happiness. All at the same time.

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By Natalie Marlin | January 13, 2023

The strange cross-section of eras and technologies becomes its own kind of visual rhetoric of alienation; the crushed blacks and embellished film grain abstract even the most rudimentary shots of hallways and open doorframes into the shapes a child might imagine as those of monsters.

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By Michael Koresky | January 12, 2023

I cannot imagine seeing something more compositionally thought-through and artfully constructed in the current cinema, or something that more compellingly refuses to divulge its secrets while also maintaining a constant engagement with so many legible ideas.

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By Susannah Gruder | January 4, 2023

The film is bolstered chiefly by the cast of nonprofessional actors, who together form an entirely authentic unit, feeding off one another’s energy for better or worse.

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By Michael Koresky | December 31, 2022

For most of its running time, Babylon barrels past any possibility of wistful reverie, content to wallow in excess and sin, only to devolve in its final third into meditations on the power and beauty of the image.

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By Matthew Eng | December 23, 2022

Try as Kore-eda might, the questions the film raises cannot be fenced off from the global fight for reproductive justice, a battle from which this politically evasive film has been totally sequestered.

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By Farihah Zaman | December 23, 2022

His latest thoughtful docu-fiction hybrid, No Bears, is deceptively gentle, initially even comedic, lulling with a ruminative pastoral quality that is gradually pierced by painful reminders that these are more than stories—they are the contours of people’s lives.

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By Dan Schindel | December 22, 2022

The camera is frequently in motion, shifting elements like characters, animals, vehicles, and terrain in an intricate dance. Despite the impossibility of the otherworldly imagery, every shot feels like it comes from an actual camera perspective, which lends the film its verisimilitude.

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By Caitlin Quinlan | December 21, 2022

What is it to flee versus to leave? What is it to grant forgiveness or to grant permission? Their predicament is not just a binary choice, it is to consider how to build a new future according to their own definitions.

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By Gavin Smith | December 15, 2022

The book just about holds together thanks to its sheer freewheeling enthusiasm and shoot-from-the-hip attitude, dispensing opinions by the yard, almost all of them hyperbolic. And hyperbole is just one of the problems.

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By Juan Barquin | December 8, 2022

The film presents itself as empathetic towards its protagonist but has little interest in navigating the murky terrain of what it means to exist as a fat, queer person in a world that loathes you.

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By Shonni Enelow | December 2, 2022

This is a psychological ghost story, to be sure, with classic elements of that genre; where Hogg departs from its typical analogies, however, is in her location of the mystery not in the unconscious of one person but in a relationship with an other.

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By Daniel Witkin | December 1, 2022
Screen Play

The soccer highlight video has proliferated. Whether 90 seconds or 10-plus minutes, these little portraits of players are essential for fans who try to keep up with the game in all its inexhaustible intricacies . . . They also have an aesthetic of their own, with their own characteristic music, montage, and mise-en-scène.