review
By Michael Koresky | February 14, 2019

Sorry Angel, by design, chronicles a decade of death and uncertainty yet is more driven by the emotional specificity of queer love, laying bare its conundrums without any pretensions to universalization.

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By Matt Connolly | February 7, 2019
At the Museum

The tonal, visual, and thematic contrasts between these two masters of British filmmaking all seem to converge around their seemingly diametric views of mother England: a sober bulwark of civilization for Jennings; a largely hollowed-out husk for Jarman.

review
By Courtney Duckworth | February 12, 2019

The repetitiveness of his project lulls us into surprising moments of realization. We are trained, as when Ji-young repeats herself, to fix our eyes on the slight alterations between films.

review
By Leo Goldsmith | February 9, 2019

Shooting their dog protagonists in often exquisitely intimate close-ups of grizzled maws, fleshy gums, and weathered paw pads, the filmmakers foreground their curious status as semi-wild beasts that subsist both in the middle and at the margins of human society.

review
By Nick Pinkerton | February 8, 2019

This feeling for that bygone world of freshwater creeks and tilled fields and as-yet-uncleared woods is one of the chief inducements recommending The Lincoln Cycle, consisting of ten two-reel episodes whose direction is credited to their star Benjamin Chapin.

review
By Emma Piper-Burket | February 6, 2019

La Isla de la Fantasia floods four times a year, and then re-emerges as before; the narrative of Los Silencios behaves in a similar manner, revealing visions or bits of information before submerging them time and again.

review
By Josh Cabrita | January 27, 2019

By primarily defining Glass in formal, thematic, and ethical opposition to the adaptations he believes have been widely mistaken for the pinnacle of comic book form, Shyamalan here is unable to loosely interpret and interpolate the genre as he did in Unbreakable.

review
By Lawrence Garcia | January 24, 2019

Clips culled from cinema and reportage flicker and transform before our eyes in a barrage of changing aspect ratios, contrast levels, and color saturation intensities; gnomic pronouncements and aphorisms (some translated, others not) boom and crackle over a detailed 7.1 sound mix.

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By Nick Pinkerton | January 19, 2019
At the Museum

Gagnon makes work that’s legitimately punk as fuck—bleak, scabrous, and resounding with a madman’s cackle.

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By Giovanni Vimercati | January 19, 2019
At the Museum

Toni Geitani’s debut feature focuses on the evanescence of historical and national memory as experienced by the first generation that did not see corpses lying in the streets but grew up surrounded by their ghosts.

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| January 19, 2019
Years in Review

Best Musical, Best Supporting Actor, Best New Old Movies, Most Irritating Camera Lens, Best Action Sequence, Best Remake, Trailer of the Year, and more!

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By Nick Pinkerton | January 18, 2019
At the Museum

Claire Simon has been working steadily in the cinema since a mid-1970s internship with Algerian filmmaker Mohammed Lakhdar-Hamina, and has been directing both narrative and nonfiction films for over 30 years now.

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By Emma Piper-Burket | January 18, 2019
At the Museum

The slow escalation throughout the film builds to show quite clearly how the confluence of time, boredom, prejudice, and weaponry create a situation with devastating consequences for all involved.

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By Caroline Madden | January 18, 2019
At the Museum

In fragmented short scenes intertwined by the turn of chance, Possible Faces keenly studies aimless characters whose lives pinball between despair and grasping the last vestiges of hope.

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By Caroline Madden | January 15, 2019
At the Museum

Schmitz whittles a leisurely yarn with only the most threadbare of narrative action. He shot with no formal script or framework in mind, content to merely observe in fixed, distant shots the desultory minutiae of his hapless subjects.